Julia Dault at Marianne Boesky Gallery

The Marianne Boesky Gallery is currently presenting the solo exhibition “Julia Dault: More Than Words. Using industrial materials”. Dault has created a series of wall sculptures that explore the distortion of parallel lines.
In the sculpture “Cherry Bomb” from 2018,  made of powder coated hand-rolled aluminum, the two figures each consist of a series of vertical parallel straight lines joined at the bottom by a horizontal bar but as the lines get higher they start to warp and bend.
“Blue Angel” also from 2018 is a lozenge shape where part of the form has a covertness quality with each line equal distance apart. By pushing the lines closer together in the top left section Dault has created an irregular shaped negative space in the center. altering the distance between the rings creates a sense of movement.
Susan Happersett
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Ricardo Cardenas at De Buck Gallery

The exhibition “Abstractions of Nature” at De Buck Gallery features Cardenas’ sculptures and wall installations. Created using a multitude of small, painted, stainless steel wires these works remind me of the practice of cross hatching, used when drawing. In a drawing an artist would use short almost straight lines to built a gradient of lines from light to to dark to form the illusion of depth and shadow. This would give a 2-D drawing the illusion of 3-D space.
Here is gallery view of “Yellow Nest” and “White Nest” both from 2018. Cardenas has built curved surfaces in 3-D space using only small lines of stainless steel.
This close up view of “Yellow Nest”  shows the intricate architecture  within each sculpture. Inspired by nature and educated as a civil engineer, Cardenas presents elegant constructions with  biomorphic sensibilities.
Susan Happersett

Beryl Korot at bitforms gallery

Beryl Korot is well known for her work in the 1970’s that juxtaposes the art of weaving with modern technology. Her current exhibition “Beryl Korot: A Coded Language” at bitforms gallery follows her work from 1980 up to and including new work from 2017.
In the entryway of the gallery there is this chart that outlines her algorithm for translate the alphabet into a series of weaving rules.
This set of transformation becomes procedure to create “Babel1”, acrylic on hand woven linen, from 1980. This piece is the Tower of Babel story from the bible transcribed into a textile.
I think “Babel 1” is a fantastic example of algorithimically generated art. I am so happy that bitforms presented Korot’s schematic cart allowing the viewer a complete visualization of her artistic process.