Kirkland Museum Denver

The Kirkland Museum in Denver Colorado has a large collection of fine and decorative art. In addition to the studio of painter Vance Kirkland the museum displays an eclectic selection of art. A few of the works feature mathematical themes.

Clark Richert’s painting R-P/Kepler is a complex tiling featuring rhombi, pentagons as well as irregular quadrilaterals.

Richard Kallweit uses small wooden cubes the build geometric sculptures.

One of Kallweit’s sculptures was also part of the JMM exhibition.

Both Richert and Kallweit are represented by Rule Gallery which is located in the Santa Fe arts district in Denver. Stop by the gallery to see some other examples of their work.

Susan Happersett

Happy Holidays!

New York sparkles with light displays this festive season.

The “Luminaries” art installation in the Winter Garden at Brookfield Place at the World Trade Center features a grid of glowing lanterns.

The curvilinear plane soars through the space following the path of the grand stairs.

Each of the lanterns are almost cubes. One of the vertical sides is slightly longer. This creates different shapes viewed from different angles.
The colors changed based on the music creating an exciting environment.

Wishing everyone Health, Happiness, and lots of Math Art in 2020,

Susan

Étienne Krähenbühl at Seizan Gallery

Seizan Gallery is currently presenting “Notre Terre / Our Earth” a solo exhibition of Étienne Krähenbühl’s prints and sculptures.

Krähenbühl creates sculptures using steel aluminum and nickel titanium that incorporate a subtle sense of movement and shadows.

“Au Gil de l’O” ( In the Flow) from 2018 consists of a series of Corten steel concentric circles suspended and slightly swinging on nickel titanium wires. In the gallery, lights are positioned to create a repetitive shadow on the floor. This creates an interesting ripple effect of intersecting circles.

“Bing Bang Bois I ( Bing Bang Wood I) “ from 2015 features burned oak rods suspended using aluminum and nickel titanium. Each blackened wood element moves independently to form a quivering sphere in space.

Susan Happersett

“Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style” at Walters Gallery in Baltimore

Today a guest blog entry from Elizabeth Whiteley:

 

If you find yourself in the Baltimore area, check out the current exhibit at the Walters Gallery. Titled “Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style” it’s a large show with works by the famed Scottish architect and other designers such as Christopher Dresser, Jessie M. King, Margaret Macdonald, and Talwin Morris. It will be on display until January 5, 2020.

The wall note for this textile design, ‘Wave Pattern in Purple, Pink, Orange, and Black’, ca. 1915-23, says “Mackintosh’s precise use of contrast and symmetry here created a brilliant optical illusion. He aligned the white, purple, and orange loops vertically against the penciled grid, but the wavy arcs of pink and black create strong diagonals that pull the eye away from the underlying structure of the pattern.”

This drawing is a lampshade design for the standard lamp, The Hill House, 1905. It shows an effective way to use bilateral symmetry on a lozenge shape.

The wall note for this chair (1904-5) says, “This chair, which Mackintosh designed for his own home, is a slightly taller version of one he first created to accompany a writing desk for The Hill House. At first glance, the chair seems rigidly angular, especially with the two columns of squares, yet Mackintosh always offset such severe geometries with a subtle softer curving line—here seen in the tall, gently concave back.

Elizabeth Whiteley

“Donald Judd and Kenneth Noland : Color and Form” at Mignoni

Mignoni Gallery on the Upper East side of Manhattan is currently presenting an exhibition that juxtaposes Donald Judd’s aluminum wall sculptures and Kennet Noland’s geometric striped canvases.

“Untitled (Bernstein 88-14)” red anodized aluminum from 1988 explores the concept of positive and negative space. The solid raised rectangular boxes go from large to small, from left to right. The empty spaces between go from small to large from left to right. Judd’s horizontal structure creates a sense of linear movement across the wall of the gallery.

Noland’s “Galore” from 1996 is also an horizontal construction. The long flattened diamond shaped canvas is painted with a series of colorful straight lines. But instead of going straight across the wall, they run parallel to the lower left and upper right sides of the rhombus. This angled formation leaves the viewer slightly unbalanced.

Susan Happersett

Manfred Mohr at Bitforms

This summer I had the privilege of seeing Manfred Mohr’s video “Cubic Limit” from 1973-1974. I was so happy to be able to see it again at Bitforms Gallery in NYC this Fall. The gallery is presenting “Manfred Mohr A Formal Language: Celebrating 50 Years of Artwork and Algorithms (1969-2019”. There is the full range of Mohr’s art on display including some more recent work.

The painting “P-511-0” from 1995-97. Is a static example of a algorithm based geometric work

The video “P-777_MA1” from 2002 is a dynamic colorful computer driven dance of geometry.

The exhibition has been extended until November 3rd

Susan Happersett

 

 

“Sinnesrausch” in Linz, Austria

In The center of the city in Linz a huge interactive series of art installations has been installed until Oct 13th. Curated by Katherina Lackner and Genovea Ruckert, the exhibition tagline is “Elastic, Plastic, Fantastic”. The basic elements of visual art as a sensory thrill- point, line, space and time. Both contemporary work and important historical art are included in this ambitious exhibition. The viewer walks through of a circuit of installations situated on many floors and outside on the roof of the building.

This is a still shot from Manfred Mohr’s computer generated movie “Cubic Limit” from 1973-1974. Using straight lines and grids Mohr has shown a progression of cubic forms moving through space.

Mariana Apollonio’s Op Art piece “Spazio ad Attivazione Cinetica”, 1966-2015 creates the optical illusion of a warped plane using black and white concentric circles.

The most ambitious contemporary installation is on the roof. “Tube Linz” , 2019 is by the collective “Numen / For Use”
Viewers become part of the art when they climb into the undulating network of tunnels. The bright blue grid structure looks different from every position. Exploring line, space, and motion.

Susan Happersett

Bridges Conference 2019 – Linz, Austria

The annual Bridges Math/Art Conference was held in Linz, Austria this year. The art exhibition is an important part of the proceedings. I always find interesting new work feature on this blog.

This year there was a particularly diverse selection of work on display.

Master fiber artist Elaine Krajenke Ellison uses the art of quilt making to illustrate mathematical phenomenon. The hand-sewn quilt titled “The Sum Of Odd Integers” accomplishes the difficult feat of representing all 17 symmetry patterns.

Krystyna Burczyk creates 3-D sculptures by cutting, folding, and twisting sheets of paper. “Platenbau” features curved rectangular planes formed into a sphere using a complex interior structure but no adhesives.

Susan Happersett

Call for Artist’s Statements for Journal of Mathematics and the Arts (JMA) Special Issue

The Journal of Mathematics and the Arts has announced an upcoming special issue devoted to artist’s statements. I will be editing this issue as a guest editor.
A lot of artists are not familiar with the concept of Math Art and I am often asked what is Math Art?  Here is my definition: In order to be considered Math Art, art work must meet one or more of these three criteria:
(1) The work is created using mathematics,
(2) it presents mathematical themes,or
(3) it is expressing the effects of mathematics on society.
Any artist who makes work that falls into any of these classifications are encouraged to submit their statement for publication. You can find the submission guidelines here.
Susan Happersett

Art on Paper Fair

While the Armory Art Fair is definitely the largest of the March NYC exhibitions, there are a number of smaller but very interesting venues.
The Art on Paper Fairs always presents an exciting array of work created on paper.
“Shifting Center” by Katrine Hildebrandt-Hussey presented by Uprise Art is a large scale drawing the viewer can actually walk into.
This drawing features a horizontal line of circles positioned to have the  center point of one circle be on the circumference of the two adjacent circles. Concentric circles are drawn outward from each sometimes overlapping and sometimes obscured. The tubular structure creates the optical illusion that the circles are getting larger nearer the entrance to the space.
The NL=US Art gallery from Rotterdam in the Netherlands presented the large pencil drawings of Alexander Roozen. Hand-drawn repetitive mark making processes fill the entire surface are drawn within a mathematical grid structure. Roozen creates very detailed precise geometric renderings of topological spaces while still retaining the subtle texture of the hand work.
Susan Happersett