Richard Long at Sperone Westwater

Richard Long has along career of creating art about nature based on his walks through different landscapes. I saw more recent work last week at Sperone Westwater.

One double height wall in the gallery features a sight-specific giant circular drawing created by the artist by hand, by applying red mud directly to the wall.
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This gallery room is taller than it is wide, so the viewer must look up to see the entire circle. This creates an interesting optical element. Although the circle has a consistent width it appears to be thicker at the bottom and thinner at the top. It is a perfect expression of how geometric appearance can change based on the location of the form and the viewer in space.
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Richard Long’s artistic practice also includes text based work. The visual poem “Mendosa Walking”  incorporates an interesting use of counting and mirror symmetry. The 12-line text has a center column using the two letter word “TO” to join the a word on each side. the number of letters in these words increases by one letter going down the rows. From “A”  “TO” “B” at the top all the way down to “HAPPENSTANCE” “TO”  “CONSEQUENCES”.

Susan Happersett

Lygia Clark at MOMA

The Museum of Modern Art in NYC is currently hosting a huge retrospective of the work of Lygia Clark (1920-1988). Clark was a member of the Brazilian Constructivist movement. The walls of the first few rooms of the exhibition display the artist’s geometric abstract paintings.  On platforms in the center of the gallery, an assortment of  her hinged metal sculptures are on display. It is these sculptures I would like to discuss. There are a number of excellent reviews of the show online – the Brooklyn Rail is an example – but I would like to focus on the sculptures. Clark created these sculptures so that viewers could manipulate the shapes, creating different
forms, becoming part of the artistic process. At the MOMA show work tables are set up throughout the galleries with reproductions of the sculptures available for the public to participate. Photography is forbidden in these galleries so I decided to reproduce one of Clarks’s more simplistic forms using paperboard and tape and taking photos of my model.

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Here is the construction process, in case you want to make one. You will need seven congruent isosceles right triangles.
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Lay out four triangle to form a square and make three hinges leaving two triangles attached on only one side.

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Take a fifth triangle and attache it to one those single attachment triangles so it is on top of the other triangle with one attachment .

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Add the sixth triangle to the fifth so they form a parallelogram.

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Turn the structure over and attach the seventh triangle to the fourth triangle from the original square so you have like a trapezoid. Now you can stand up the structure in many positions.
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— Susan Happersett